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Peasant Proprietors at Home.

During a recent visit of some weeks to portions of the distressed districts of the north-west and west of Ireland in company with two other gentlemen, several of the glebe-land farms, which have been sold to small proprietors by the Church Commissioners, were visited. Public attention has recently been so much drawn to the question of peasant proprietorship, and is so likely to be still more seriosly turned to it, that I think it may not be without interest to place on record a short account of these very interesting visits, which formed a pleast contrast to the disheartening work we were chiefly engaged in...

The following morning we visited the glebe lands of Tattyreagh, which had been purchased by the tenants from the Commissioners in 1872, comprising about 40 farms, varying in size from 4 to 154 acres, and in price from 60l. to 1,000l., but chiefly of 20 acres and under. They are situated about five miles from Omagh in an opposite direction to those we had seen the previous day...

On arriving at Tattyreagh, the first farm we inquired about was that of Annie Slevin, who had about five acres. Her son was busily engaged upon the land. He did not think the land would keep him and his mother; but they had another business behind, a whisky shop, which, from appearances, was profitable...

Excerpted from The Nineteenth Century, a Monthly Review, Vol, VIII, July-December 1880
edited by James Knowles. C. Kegan Paul & Co., London.