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LEADING AUTHOR OF SCREEN IS DEAD

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 26 (AP)-William Slavens McNutt, whose writing career ranged from the battlefields of France to the sound stages of movieland, died last night.

The fifty-two-year-old screen playwright succumbed to bronchial pneumonia and a weakened heart at his La Canada estate, where he had been under treatment a few days.

When the end came unexpectedly, his wife, Louise, and his brother, Patterson, film writer and producer, were at the bedside. His father, George L. McNtutt, of suburban Van Nuys, also survives.

McNutt, whose last script was "Stolen Honeymoon" for Ginger Rogers and Charles Boyer, returned to R-K-O studio last week after a vacation of several months.

His death was a shock to the motion picture industry, in which he had been an ace scenarist since 1930. Among the big money-making pictures which he helped prepare for the screen were "Lives of a Bengal Lancer," "So Red the Rose," "Rhythm on the Range," "Annapolis Farewell," "Lady and Gent," "Night of June 13," "The Broken Wing" and "Ladies of the Big House."

McNutt, born in Urbana, Ill., September 12, 1885, crowded far-flung adventure into his fifty-two years. From Emerson College, he went on the stage for three years, then gave up acting to write short stories. After two years on the staff of the Post Intellingencer in Seattle, Wash., he came to New York in 1914, did magazine articles, news syndicate reporting, war correspondence and plays. His droll fiction, published in national magazines, attracted the attention of Hollywood film producers. Paramount was the first to sign him to a contract and teamed him for a time with another scenarist, Grover Jones.

With his film earnings he bought a baronial estate at La Canada in the foothills and a yacht in which he frequently cruised off the Southern California coast.

He had a "hideout," where he did some of his motion picture writing, in preference to a studio office.

Reno (Nevada) Evenig Gazette, January 26, 1938.


WM. SLAVENS McNUTT DEAD

Career Ranged from French Battlefields to Hollywood

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 26. -- AP --William Slavens McNutt, whose writing career ranged from the battlefields of France to the sound stages of movieland, died last night-- so unexpectedly his Hollywood friends did not know he had been ill.

The 52-year-old screen playwright succumbed to bronchial pneumonia and a weakened heart at his La Canada estate.

McNutt, whose last script was "Stolen Honeymoon" for Ginger Rogers and Charles Boyer, returned to R.K.O. studio last week after a vacation of several months.

He had bean an ace scenarist since 1930. Among the big money-making pictures which he helped prepare for the screen were "Lives of a Bengal Lancer," "So Red the Rose," "Rhythm on the Range," "Annapolis Farewell," "Lady and Gent," "Night of June 13," "The Broken Wing," and "Ladies of the Big House."

McNutt, born in Urbana, Ill., September 12, 1885, crowded far-flung adventure into his 52 years. From Emerson College, he went on the stage for three years, then gave up acting to write short stories. After two years on the staff of the Seattle Post Intelligencer, he went to New York in 1914, did magazine articles, news-syndicate reporting, war correspondence and plays.

His droll fiction, published in national magazines, attracted attention of Hollywood film producers.

Indiana (Pennsylvania) Evening Gazaette, January 26, 1938.

WILLIAM S. McNUTT, SCREEN SCENARIST.

One of Most Successful Film Writers in Recent Years Dies in Hollywood.
FORMER MAGAZINE AUTHOR.
Worked at Variety of Trades Throughout Country Before Turning to Fiction.

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 26 (AP). William Slavens McNutt, one of Hollywood's highest-paid scenarists, died in his suburban home last night of pneumonia and a weakened heart.

Born fifty-two years ago in Urbana, Ill., Mr. McNutt first attracted national attention as a teller of racetrack yarns. During the war he was European correspondent for Collier's, and after the war he was a reporter and a playwright before coming to Hollywood.

Surviving are his widow, his father, George L., and his brother, Patterson.

Son of Presbyterian Minister

In a brief autobiography which he once prepared for The Saturday Evening Post, for which he wrote many stories, Mr. McNutt explained that his father was a Presbyterian minister with a distaste for public schools. As a result, young William was educated mostly at home, until at the age of 13 he went to work in a factory.

There followed four years of alternate work and roaming about the country, after which he spent a year at the Sterns Preparatory School. Then he went to Boston, became a carpenter and enrolled at Elmerson College of Oratory, where he studied dramatics and resolved to go on the stage. A few years of vaudeville and stock trouping convinced him that his destiny lay elsewhere, so he traveled westward, to Canada and Alaska, lumber jacking and earning his living at whatever tasks came to hand.

At about this time he began writing short stories, one of which he sold to McClure's Magazine. He also worked for a time as a reporter on The Seattle Post-Intelligencer and continued to write short stories which sold with more frequency.

Except for one brief and unsuccessful attempt at scenario writing, Mr. McNutt joined the Hollywood writing contingent comparatively late-- not going there until 1930, when he was signed by Paramount and teamed with Grover Jones.

Mr. McNutt was twice married, having been divorced from his first wife, Mrs. Georgina McNally McNutt, in 1927 and remarried that year. His second wife was the former Mrs. Louise Tanner Glorius. His brother, Patterson McNutt, is also a Hollywood writer, working for Paramount.

New York (New York) Times, January 27, 1938.